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Embrace Aging with Strength and Purpose


Aging is inescapable. We do have a choice though... we can age well or not so well. I’ve been personal training and teaching yoga in the Boston area for 15 years. Recently I have come to realize that I'm surrounded by long time clients and students who are 80 years old plus. My clients are spry, strong and independent. They have been exercising with me for 10-15 years and probably before me. They made the choice to take part in how they age. To be proactive. Purposeful movement has changed how they age. Strength training is an important component to aging well. If aging is inevitable, which it is, a decrease in quality of life is not.

To get started all you need to do is start moving more than you do. Once you do that for a while you can begin to build your exercise routine like my clients. Your return on investment will be to live with a quality of life that allows you the freedom to move, continue your activities into your 90's and maintain your independence for as long as possible.


The World Health Organization(https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/ageing-and-health#:~:text=Common%20health%20conditions%20associated%20with,%2C%20diabetes%2C%20depression%20and%20dementia.) reports that with older age come common conditions such as osteoarthritis, diabetes, depression and dementia. Studies show that Strength training will help mediate the effects of osteoarthritis, diabetes, depression and dementia.


STRENGTH TRAINING

  • Sedentary adults lose muscle mass at a rate of 3% to 8% per decade.

  • Less muscle to burn calories equals increase in fat accumulation.

  • Ten weeks of strength training has the propensity to increase muscle by 3 pounds of body weight.

  • With an increase in muscle mass resulting from ten weeks of strength training there is more muscle to burn calories resulting in a decrease of fat weight by nearly 4 pounds. .

  • Benefits of strength training include improved physical performance, functional independence, cognitive abilities, and self-esteem.

  • Strength training may help prevent and/or manage diabetes.

  • Strength training may improve cardiovascular health.

  • Strength training may improve bone density.

  • Strength training may improve over all musculoskeletal function by easing back pain and discomfort from arthritis.

  • Strength training reverses specific aging factors in skeletal muscle(https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22777332/)

Strength training increases muscle mass allowing us to continue to do the things we do. Strength training has also been shown to improve brain function. A study published in the European Review of Aging and Physical Actvity ,

(https://eurapa.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s11556-019-0217-2) showed that strength training substantially improved brain function in healthy older adults, older adults with mild cognitive impairment and older adults in the early stages of dementia. Another study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association,

concluded that low muscle mass in older adults was significantly and independently associated with faster subsequent executive function decline over a three year period.



The 40 Minute Workout is a bio-mechanically aligned strength training program.

Three classes a week = full body fitness training by week's end. 

Mo



Monday

Foam Roll/Core

Wednesday

Foam Roll-Stretch Upper Body

Friday

Foam Roll-Stretch Lower Body

Classes stream live on Zoom at 6:30 am and on The 40 Minute OnDemand Channel by 8am.




Take charge of your health! Join us for The 40 Minute Workout. Click button below.




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